英國空間 中式菜單

Yatwan Hui  許逸韻 (Urban Beings)

yatwan huiThe menus of Chinese restaurants in Britain have changed, developed and diversified throughout the last few decades.  What about the places where Chinese food is eaten?

過去幾十年間,英國中餐不斷改進創新,但飲食的環境又怎樣呢?倫敦唐人街的中餐館跟埠仔的餐館比較,有些什麼不同之處?裝修陳設對食客的行為又有何影響?

 

 

English

 

The menus of Chinese restaurants in Britain have changed developed and diversified throughout the last few decades, what about the physical places where Chinese food is eaten? How do the restaurants in London Chinatown compare to the local Chinese restaurants? And how do the layout and furnishing of the restaurants affect the way diners behave?


London Chinatown, 1990s

When I was a child, my family used to make a weekly pilgrimage to London Chinatown to ‘yum-cha’. Yum-cha literally means to ‘drink tea’ in Cantonese but it’s actually a very filling lunch of dim-sums. Although the buildings in London Chinatown were converted Georgian terraces, the crowded Chinese shop signs and other Chinese motifs reminded me of Hong Kong. This was a welcome fix of homesickness for Hong Kong in the early days of emigration.

The restaurants would be also richly decorated to recall the tea houses in Hong Kong. There would be water features, such as a small pond with goldfish or koi. Space may be separated with intricately carved wooden screens and the odd dragon can be found curling around a column to surprise and delight diners. The walls would be covered with textured wallpapers with hanging framed prints or fabrics of Chinese calligraphy and water painting. Heavy padded wooden chairs would be effortlessly added to by nimble waiters to accommodate extra diners onto tightly packed tables with flowing layered beige or salmon pink tablecloths.

Diners were predominately Hong Kong Chinese immigrants, though a small number of British and international tourists would also venture in for a taste of the Orient. As diners would sit within touching distance of the table next to them, a round table would create a human wall for some privacy. The lighting would be bright and the restaurant would reverberate with the sound of hundreds of diners chattering loudly catching up on the latest events and gossips. In restaurants where trolleys laden with steaming hot dim sums negotiated a circuit around the restaurant, the waitresses would add to the chatter by shouting out the names of the dishes on offer.

One stark difference between London Chinatown and the Hong Kong tea houses is that the London appeared to be much cleaner. British Chinese diners would not be seen to wash their chopsticks, bowls and tea cups with jasmine tea, nor would they be sweeping food off the table onto the floor. The floor of British Chinese restaurants would also be covered with thick heavy duty carpets, usually of a dark colour with richly decorated patterns, whereas in Hong Kong floor surface can be easily swept and mopped.

Though one might assume the highly decorated Chinese motifs would appeal to the general British public for a quick visit to the East, London Chinatown was a hub for the Chinese community to gather for a reminder of their homeland.


Local restaurants, 1990s

Although some local restaurants on the high street would also be richly adorned like their Chinatown counterparts, they would not have the same heaving and bustling atmosphere but retained an air of quiet and localness. Most of the local Chinese restaurants would be family run businesses, where the food would be the main feature and function more valued than decoration. They tended to be simply decorated with neutral colours, perhaps with a framed artwork as the main feature (calligraphy or a plastic relief landscape). The tables and chairs would be similar to the ones found in Chinatown, probably because they bought them from the same importers.

There would be few Chinese diners, as many Chinese at that time were in the catering business themselves. Diners would be predominately British locals who would appreciate the more generous spaces between tables than in the Chinatown restaurants. There would usually be tables available for walk-in diners of any group size and even when they were busier on Friday and Saturday nights, diners would still be able to hear the soundtracks of popular 80s and 90s Canto-pop playing softly in a loop in the background. The lighting would tend to be dim with a yellow glow to create a mysterious atmosphere from the orients.

The simple, no frills local Chinese restaurants offered similar menus with their competitors for what they perceive the British public would want and these menus have made few changes throughout the years. Similarly the decors are simple and had few changes and seemingly forgotten to be renovated.


Chinatown, 2010s

The high turnover of restaurants and customers in Chinatown today means many restaurants are constantly re-inventing themselves or frequently renovating to keep up with the fierce competition. Customers have become more diverse and restaurants have to attract the old Hong Kong crowd, their grown-up children, Londoners of all ethnic groups, tourists curious for a taste of the orient and the numerous Chinese visiting, studying and working in London.

Most restaurants have swapped their heavy, dark and intricately detailed furnishing for lighter, brighter and simpler décor to achieve the ‘modern Chinese’ look. Restaurants are now more spacious and frameless graphics are hung on white-washed walls, or even painted directly on the wall to showcase that they’re bespoke and not purchased from the same importers. Hard floor surfaces such as polished and stained wooden floorboards replace the dated heavy duty carpets. Tablecloths are still laid, but have also become whiter in colour to match the clean interiors. Simple but dark lacquered wooden chairs suggest the Chinese heritage.

The lights have also become brighter and different types of lightings are introduced to the typically recessed ceiling spotlights. Some restaurants have up or down-lighters by each table and some even have large lanterns hanging above the tables. These crown the identity of each table in its rightful place in the restaurant. The hard surfaces in the restaurant also reverberate with the chatter of diners with a similar buzz to the restaurants in yesteryears, though it is now a blend of Cantonese, Mandarin, English and other foreign languages.

The decorations of the restaurants are now designed to match the menu and the cuisines on offer. For example Leong’s Legend named after the classical story of revolutionaries is aptly decorated like a village tavern with portraits in the legends of the story. The rise of restaurant chains such as Royal China offer regulars with the peace of mind to know they can have all their favourites no matter which part of London they are in. This brand is reflected in the interiors such as the colour palette of rustic gold on shiny lacquered black surfaces.

Fierce competition in Chinatown means restaurateurs pay attention to all aspects of their presentations, from the menu, food, interior, staff and website.


Local restaurants, 2010s

The London based architect Wendy Liu has been designing a few Chinese restaurants in London, Plymouth, Southampton, Manchester and Swansea. Apart from the Swansea project, all are on high streets or in the city centres. She described how Chinese restaurants have become more savvy and aware that the interiors can attract the desired clientele and which fit in with the surrounding environments. For example, the Plymouth restaurant is close to the seaside and follows a white and blue colour scheme to create an airy modern seaside feel.

Many local restaurants have also opted for the ‘modern Chinese’ look with light, airy spaces, hard wall and floor furnishings. Large windows allow in natural lighting in the day and create a transparent surface for passers-by to see the diners and food inside. Though some restaurants still favour the Oriental mystique with dimly lit richly ornate details and furnished with moon doors, these are conscious design decisions to create a certain ambience. Similar to their Chinatown counterparts, local restaurants also realise the importance of all aspects of presentation to compete with the other cuisines available on the high street.


Restaurants as social places

The clientele that come with these restaurants have also changed. I remember London Chinatown to be a social gathering space for the British Chinese community. Families, relatives and friends would meet on a weekly basis at their usual restaurant and you would always find someone you know. Before the popular use of mobile phones and social networking sites, this weekend meeting would be the opportunity to have some time off, catch up with each other and to have a taste of the old Hong Kong in a familiar environment.

Perhaps the older generations still meet like this, but the younger generation has become more fickle with where they would try out different restaurants according to which friends they’re with, the time of the day, the type of food and the offers available. The restaurant has become more than a meeting place for comfort food, the younger generation and also the non-Chinese customers are curious to try out new dishes (of good value, of course) in a comfortable environment. They are more demanding and require a wider set of criteria to fulfil their satisfaction and retain their loyalty.
The local high streets have also become more competitive as young professionals develop an eating out habit for business and leisure, for weekday lunches and dinners as well as on weekends. Perhaps the second generation now running the family business also eat out themselves and have a more business approach, local Chinese restaurants have become more sophisticated to reflect current trends in the market.

With the simple eyes of a child, I used to think there were two types of Chinese restaurants – the noisy and highly decorated ones in Chinatown playing up the ‘traditional Chinese’ style and the quieter, simple and humble local restaurants on the high street. While some restaurants continue on the traditional furnishing route today, many have opted for the cleaner and simpler ‘modern Chinese’ look more akin to a modern British restaurant, but with a few distinctively Chinese motifs or colours. Could this reflect that Chinese restaurants are comfortable enough with their place in Britain to shred off the heavy traditional heritage veneer to explore its future development in line with other modern British establishments?

繁體譯文

 

過去幾十年間,英國中餐不斷改進創新,但飲食的環境又怎樣呢?倫敦唐人街的中餐館跟埠仔的餐館比較,有些什麼不同之處?裝修陳設對食客的行為又有何影響?


九十年代的倫敦唐人街

小時候,我們一家每星期都會長途跋涉到唐人街“飲茶”。廣東話“飲茶”,字面上是喝茶的意思,但實際上,它是一頓包括點心、粉、麵、飯的豐富午餐。雖然倫敦唐人街的建築物多是喬治王時代風格改裝的排屋,但整條街佈滿中式招牌,令我回想起香港。對當時我這個新移民來說,這種親切感可以舒緩思鄉的情緒。

當時中餐館大多模仿港式茶樓,裝飾華麗,設有養著金魚、錦鯉的小池塘,用雕刻精緻的屏風將地方分隔,圓柱上的飛龍往往為食客帶來驚喜。牆壁貼著凹凸紋牆紙,再掛上名家字畫或水墨畫。如有需要"加位",侍應生會熟練地把加有坐墊的沉重木椅搬到本已擠迫的桌子旁邊。通常他們都會選用米色或淺粉紅色的枱布。

食客大部分是香港移民,但也有少數勇於嘗試東方美食的英國人及來自世界各地的遊客。由於枱與枱之間的距離伸手可及,藉著客人圍著圓桌而坐,得以保留點點私人空間。在明亮的燈光下,整個茶樓只聽見食客在高談闊論或閒話家常。加上侍應一邊推著載滿熱騰騰點心的手推車穿插食客之間,一邊喊著點心名稱,周遭環境雖然嘈吵,但氣氛熱鬧。

一個明顯的分別,是倫敦唐人街的茶樓比香港的清潔衛生得多。在英國,不會見中國食客用熱茶清洗筷子、碗碟、茶杯,也不會見他們把枱上的食物殘骸撥到地上。英國中餐館通常使用耐用的厚地毯,而且多是深色及圖案豐富,而香港的則多用容易打掃清潔的地板。

雖然英國普羅大眾會被唐人街濃厚的東方色彩吸引而到訪,其實,唐人街是華人社會聚集一起懷緬故鄉的地方。


九十年代的埠仔餐館

雖然有些埠仔的中餐館跟唐人街同行的裝修同樣輝煌,但就沒有那麼熱鬧,氣氛較為寧靜,保留了些"埠仔"本色。埠仔中餐館多數是由家族經營,著重菜肴的質素,裝修是其次,往往以柔和色調及簡單擺設為主,也許牆上掛著一幅主題書法或山水畫,桌椅跟唐人街的差不多,大概是來自同一入口商的原因。

當年由於華人多從事飲食業,因此埠仔中餐館的華人食客少之又少,大部分客人都是當地英國人。為迎合他們對空間的要求,桌子會分佈得寬鬆一些,而且不論人數多少,大部分時間也不需預先訂枱。即使在較繁忙的星期五、六晚上,食客也能聽見背景不斷播放著柔和悅耳的八、九十年代粵語流行曲。暗淡而微微偏黃的燈光營造出來自東方的神秘感。

簡單不誇巧的埠仔中餐館菜單,同行與同行之間大同小異,全部是公認為適合英國人口味的菜式,多年來也沒有多大改變,陳設依舊是簡簡單單的,像是忘了翻新似的。


一零年代的唐人街

今時今日,唐人街餐館的競爭激烈,轉手次數頻密,經營者必需不斷創新,加入新元素,搞"噱頭",才不會被淘汰。客人種類增多,除了要吸引香港移民這班舊客人,亦要吸納他們的下一代,居住在倫敦的各個族群,對東方食品好奇的遊客,及眾多在英國留學、公幹、暫居的華人。

大多數中餐館放棄以往陰暗、隆重、傳統的深色傢具擺設,取而代之的是精簡光猛的裝修,務求營造一個"摩登中國"的觀感。現代中餐館比較寬敞,雪白的牆壁上掛著無框的圖案,設計甚至是直接印在牆上,突出這些獨特設計並不是從入口商買得到的一般貨色。硬地板,如蠟木地板,取代舊日的厚地毯;桌子依舊蓋上枱布,但選用較淺的顏色來襯托清新的室內設計,只有簡單深色的漆木椅帶出中國傳統文化。

燈光變得光猛,除了典型嵌入式天花射燈外,加入了不同的照明方法,例如枱旁設有高燈、低燈,甚至在臺上方掛上大燈籠,好像是突顯餐枱在餐館中的身份地位。食客的交談聲就像昔日的餐館,不過語言則夾雜著廣東話、普通話、英語及其他外語。

裝修設計會配合餐館形象及提供的菜式,例如"梁山好漢"取名於一個山賊英雄的經典故事,於是就恰當地佈置成鄉村酒館一樣,還掛有傳說中人物的畫像。連鎖中餐館如"皇朝"的興起,令常客可以放心,不論在倫敦的哪個角落,都能找到他們的"至愛"。金色襯光身黑漆油的室內設計,成為了"皇朝"的品牌。

要在唐人街這個競爭激烈的環境下生存,就必需留意餐館的每方面,從形象到菜式、食物、陳設、員工和網站。


一零年代的埠仔餐館

駐倫敦建築師劉穎瑜設計的中餐館遍佈於倫敦、普利茅斯、修鹹頓、曼徹斯特和史雲斯。除了史雲斯的項目,全都位於大街或鄰近市中心。她形容中餐館越來越精明,懂得利用室內設計來融入周圍環境,吸引所渴求的客人。例如普利茅斯的餐館靠近海邊,便用白色和藍色配合,營造出海傍陣陣涼風感覺。

許多埠仔中餐館都選擇"摩登中國"的外觀,光猛、通爽、實心牆和硬地板設計。白天,透明大窗戶可讓自然光線進入;晚上,路人可清晰看見裏面的食客和飯菜。雖然有些中餐館依然喜歡使用東方神秘色彩設計,暗淡光線、華麗細節、半月拱門,但這些設計全都是精挑細選來營造一個特定的氣氛。跟唐人街同行一樣,埠仔中餐館亦深明要跟大街上其他食店競爭,每一個經營細節都很重要。


中餐館作為社交場所

中餐館的客人亦有改變。我記得從前倫敦唐人街是英國華人社會聚會的地方。每星期,親戚朋友會在他們常到的餐館見面,而且多數會遇見熟人。在手提電話和社交網站未流行之前,週末的聚餐可讓大家在熟悉的環境下輕鬆一下,有機會聯絡感情和回味"老香港"。

可能老一輩依然用這種形式會面,但年輕一代就善變得多。他們會根據見面的對象、時間、食物種類及各種優惠而嘗試不同餐館。餐館由一個朋友會面一齊享用家鄉菜的地方,演變成到現在好奇年輕人和非華人食客嘗試新菜式(當然要實惠)的舒適環境。要留著這班要求高的消費者,就要符合他們的廣泛要求。

埠仔的中餐館亦變得更具競爭力。年輕專業人士習慣出外用膳,無論是為工作、娛樂、平日午餐或是週末晚餐。繼續經營家族生意的移民第二代亦會出外用膳,去瞭解市場狀況。為反映市場趨勢,埠仔中餐館的品味亦相應提高。

從兒時的角度來看,我認為中餐館分兩種:一種是唐人街嘈吵、裝飾華麗的中餐館,另一種是在大街上靜一點、簡單低調的埠仔餐館。當一些中餐館繼續走傳統中式路線時,許多中餐館選擇看起來像英國餐廳般清簡的"摩登中式"設計,但仍保留少數鮮明的中式花紋。這是否反映出中國餐館對他們在英國飲食業的地位有足夠信心,去卸下沉重的傳統遺產?它們的未來發展會跟其他英式機構看齊? 

简体译文

 

过去几十年间,英国中餐不断改进创新,但饮食的环境又怎样呢?伦敦唐人街的中餐馆跟埠仔的餐馆比较,有些什么不同之处?装修陈设对食客的行为又有何影响?


九十年代的伦敦唐人街

小时候,我们一家每星期都会长途跋涉到唐人街"饮茶"。广东话"饮茶",字面上是喝茶的意思,但实际上,它是一顿包括点心、粉、面、饭的丰富午餐。虽然伦敦唐人街的建筑物多是乔治王时代风格改装的排屋,但整条街布满中式招牌,令我回想起香港。对当时我这个新移民来说,这种亲切感可以舒缓思乡的情绪。

当时中餐馆大多模仿港式茶楼,装饰华丽,设有养着金鱼、锦鲤的小池塘,用雕刻精致的屏风将地方分隔,圆柱上的飞龙往往为食客带来惊喜。墙壁贴着凹凸纹墙纸,再挂上名家字画或水墨画。如有需要"加位",侍应生会熟练地把加有坐垫的沉重木椅搬到本已挤迫的桌子旁边。通常他们都会选用米色或浅粉红色的台布。

食客大部分是香港移民,但也有少数勇于尝试东方美食的英国人及来自世界各地的游客。由于台与台之间的距离伸手可及,藉着客人围着圆桌而坐,得以保留点点私人空间。在明亮的灯光下,整个茶楼只听见食客在高谈阔论或闲话家常。加上侍应一边推着载满热腾腾点心的手推车穿插食客之间,一边喊着点心名称,周遭环境虽然嘈吵,但气氛热闹。

一个明显的分别,是伦敦唐人街的茶楼比香港的清洁卫生得多。在英国,不会见中国食客用热茶清洗筷子、碗碟、茶杯,也不会见他们把台上的食物残骸拨到地上。英国中餐馆通常使用耐用的厚地毯,而且多是深色及图案丰富,而香港的则多用容易打扫清洁的地板。

虽然英国普罗大众会被唐人街浓厚的东方色彩吸引而到访,其实,唐人街是华人社会聚集一起怀缅故乡的地方。


九十年代的埠仔餐馆

虽然有些埠仔的中餐馆跟唐人街同行的装修同样辉煌,但就没有那么热闹,气氛较为宁静,保留了些"埠仔"本色。埠仔中餐馆多数是由家族经营,着重菜肴的质素,装修是其次,往往以柔和色调及简单摆设为主,也许墙上挂着一幅主题书法或山水画,桌椅跟唐人街的差不多,大概是来自同一入口商的原因。

当年由于华人多从事饮食业,因此埠仔中餐馆的华人食客少之又少,大部分客人都是当地英国人。为迎合他们对空间的要求,桌子会分布得宽松一些,而且不论人数多少,大部分时间也不需预先订台。即使在较繁忙的星期五、六晚上,食客也能听见背景不断播放着柔和悦耳的八、九十年代粤语流行曲。暗淡而微微偏黄的灯光营造出来自东方的神秘感。

简单不夸巧的埠仔中餐馆菜单,同行与同行之间大同小异,全部是公认为适合英国人口味的菜式,多年来也没有多大改变,陈设依旧是简简单单的,像是忘了翻新似的。


一零年代的唐人街

今时今日,唐人街餐馆的竞争激烈,转手次数频密,经营者必需不断创新,加入新元素,搞"噱头",才不会被淘汰。客人种类增多,除了要吸引香港移民这班旧客人,亦要吸纳他们的下一代,居住在伦敦的各个族群,对东方食品好奇的游客,及众多在英国留学、公干、暂居的华人。

大多数中餐馆放弃以往阴暗、隆重、传统的深色家具摆设,取而代之的是精简光猛的装修,务求营造一个"摩登中国"的观感。现代中餐馆比较宽敞,雪白的墙壁上挂着无框的图案,设计甚至是直接印在墙上,突出这些独特设计并不是从入口商买得到的一般货色。硬地板,如蜡木地板,取代旧日的厚地毯;桌子依旧盖上台布,但选用较浅的颜色来衬托清新的室内设计,只有简单深色的漆木椅带出中国传统文化。

灯光变得光猛,除了典型嵌入式天花射灯外,加入了不同的照明方法,例如台旁设有高灯、低灯,甚至在台上方挂上大灯笼,好像是突显餐台在餐馆中的身份地位。食客的交谈声就像昔日的餐馆,不过语言则夹杂着广东话、普通话、英语及其他外语。

装修设计会配合餐馆形象及提供的菜式,例如"梁山好汉"取名于一个山贼英雄的经典故事,于是就恰当地布置成乡村酒馆一样,还挂有传说中人物的画像。连锁中餐馆如"皇朝"的兴起,令常客可以放心,不论在伦敦的哪个角落,都能找到他们的"至爱"。金色衬光身黑漆油的室内设计,成为了"皇朝"的品牌。

要在唐人街这个竞争激烈的环境下生存,就必需留意餐馆的每方面,从形象到菜式、食物、陈设、员工和网站。


一零年代的埠仔餐馆

驻伦敦建筑师刘颖瑜设计的中餐馆遍布于伦敦、普利茅斯、修咸顿、曼彻斯特和史云斯。除了史云斯的项目,全都位于大街或邻近市中心。她形容中餐馆越来越精明,懂得利用室内设计来融入周围环境,吸引所渴求的客人。例如普利茅斯的餐馆靠近海边,便用白色和蓝色配合,营造出海傍阵阵凉风感觉。

许多埠仔中餐馆都选择"摩登中国"的外观,光猛、通爽、实心墙和硬地板设计。白天,透明大窗户可让自然光线进入;晚上,路人可清晰看见里面的食客和饭菜。虽然有些中餐馆依然喜欢使用东方神秘色彩设计,暗淡光线、华丽细节、半月拱门,但这些设计全都是精挑细选来营造一个特定的气氛。跟唐人街同行一样,埠仔中餐馆亦深明要跟大街上其他食店竞争,每一个经营细节都很重要。


中餐馆作为社交场所

中餐馆的客人亦有改变。我认得从前伦敦唐人街是英国华人社会聚会的地方。每星期,亲戚朋友会在他们常到的餐馆见面,而且多数会遇见熟人。在手提电话和社交网站未流行之前,周末的聚餐可让大家在熟悉的环境下轻松一下,有机会联络感情和回味"老香港"。

可能老一辈依然用这种形式会面,但年轻一代就善变得多。他们会根据见面的对象、时间、食物种类及各种优惠而尝试不同餐馆。餐馆由一个朋友会面一齐享用家乡菜的地方,演变成到现在好奇年轻人和非华人食客尝试新菜式(当然要实惠)的舒适环境。要留着这班要求高的消费者,就要符合他们的广泛要求。

埠仔的中餐馆亦变得更具竞争力。年轻专业人士习惯出外用膳,无论是为工作、娱乐、平日午餐或是周末晚餐。继续经营家族生意的移民第二代亦会出外用膳,去了解市场状况。为反映市场趋势,埠仔中餐馆的品味亦相应提高。

从儿时的角度来看,我认为中餐馆分两种:一种是唐人街嘈吵、装饰华丽的中餐馆,另一种是在大街上静一点、简单低调的埠仔餐馆。当一些中餐馆继续走传统中式路线时,许多中餐馆选择看起来像英国餐厅般清简的"摩登中式"设计,但仍保留少数鲜明的中式花纹。这是否反映出中国餐馆对他们在英国饮食业的地位有足够信心,去卸下沉重的传统遗产?它们的未来发展会跟其他英式机构看齐?

Author 作者

 

Yat emigrated from Hong Kong with her parents as a seven year old to London. She studied architecture at Bath and a master in sustainable urban design in Sweden. She has travelled to and lived in many different places around the world to explore how architecture affects our daily lives and behaviour. Upon her return to London she established Urban Beings, which builds on the human experience of being in a city to help people enjoy the city better though design, research and event projects.

 

 

許逸韻七歲跟隨父母從香港移居倫敦,在巴斯大學修建築課程後,再到瑞典進修持續性城市設計碩士課程。她遊歷及居住世界各地,探索建築對我們日常生活及行為的影響。回倫敦後,成立了 "Urban Beings",以城市人的經歷為基礎,通過設計、研究和活動計劃,令大家可享受城市生活。

 

 

许逸韵七岁跟随父母从香港移居伦敦,在巴斯大学修建筑课程后,再到瑞典进修持续性城市设计硕士课程。她游历及居住世界各地,探索建筑对我们日常生活及行为的影响。回伦敦后,成立了 "Urban Beings",以城市人的经历为基础,通过设计、研究和活动计划,令大家可享受城市生活。

 

Translator 譯者


chun-yee chengAfter finishing Secondary 3 in Hong Kong, Chun-yee Cheng continued her studies in England and achieved an A grade in A-Level Chinese through self-learning. She has previously worked at the Science Museum in London and is currently a Research Associate in the Chemical Engineering Department of Imperial College. In her free time, she also enjoys training and competing in Brazilian Jiujitsu.

 

 

 

鄭俊宜在香港完成中三課程後, 轉到英國升學, 並自修考取高級程度中文科A級。她曾工作於倫敦科學博物館, 現於帝國學院化學工程系任職研究工作。空閒時, 她亦喜歡參加巴西柔術的訓練及比賽。

 

 

郑俊宜在香港完成中三课程后, 转到英国升学, 并自修考取高级程度中文科A级。她曾工作于伦敦科学博物馆, 现于帝国学院化学工程系任职研究工作。空闲时, 她亦喜欢参加巴西柔术的训练及比赛。